animalsaddict

by Katherine Yaksich

Happy Earth Day! 

 Scenes of the Gentoo penguin colony at Port Lockroy, the southernmost post office in the world located in Antarctica.  

 This year the Penguin Post Office received a record number of applicants for 4 jobs requiring a 5 month stint without running water or electricity.  

 There is so much beauty all around us and Antarctica has definitely given me a greater appreciation for our planet.  

 #antarcticaordie 

 (at Antarctica)

Happy Earth Day!

Scenes of the Gentoo penguin colony at Port Lockroy, the southernmost post office in the world located in Antarctica.

This year the Penguin Post Office received a record number of applicants for 4 jobs requiring a 5 month stint without running water or electricity.

There is so much beauty all around us and Antarctica has definitely given me a greater appreciation for our planet.

#antarcticaordie

(at Antarctica)

by Katherine Yaksich

Despite this image that shows a large number of chinstrap penguins on Deception Island, Antarctica, 1/3 of this breeding colony has been lost in the past 20 years most likely due to a warming planet.  

 #antarcticaordie (at Antarctica)

Despite this image that shows a large number of chinstrap penguins on Deception Island, Antarctica, 1/3 of this breeding colony has been lost in the past 20 years most likely due to a warming planet.

#antarcticaordie (at Antarctica)

by Katherine Yaksich

Porpoising penguins are one of the most difficult things to photograph. Not only are they incredibly fast, but they’re also nearly impossible to track. 🐧🐧🐧 
#antarcticaordie 

 (at Antarctica)

Porpoising penguins are one of the most difficult things to photograph. Not only are they incredibly fast, but they’re also nearly impossible to track. 🐧🐧🐧
#antarcticaordie

(at Antarctica)

by Katherine Yaksich

| FEEDING TIME | 

 A Gentoo penguin feeds it’s chick a large piece of krill to prepare it for winter, which is fast approaching.  
It’s common to see parent Gentoo penguins leading their chicks on a feeding chase, forcing the chicks to exercise and learn how to become independent.  

 #antarcticaordie (at Antarctica)

| FEEDING TIME |

A Gentoo penguin feeds it’s chick a large piece of krill to prepare it for winter, which is fast approaching.
It’s common to see parent Gentoo penguins leading their chicks on a feeding chase, forcing the chicks to exercise and learn how to become independent.

#antarcticaordie (at Antarctica)

by Katherine Yaksich

Exactly 5 years ago today, I reset my life and hopped on a plane bound for South Africa and Mozambique not really knowing what the future would hold.  

 I’m excited to return to South Africa and Tanzania this upcoming summer with @andrewmklein to hopefully see some big cats play ball, summit Kilimanjaro, and tell some unexpected stories.  

 South Africa was my first experience in the African wild and it holds a special place in my heart. Pictured here is a lion we encountered on a night drive a few meters from our open air vehicle at Kruger National Park.  

 These past 5 years have flown by and I look back with a grateful heart as I prepare to come full circle.  

 All My Best, 
Reuben 

 #bigcatsplayball 

 (at South Africa)

Exactly 5 years ago today, I reset my life and hopped on a plane bound for South Africa and Mozambique not really knowing what the future would hold.

I’m excited to return to South Africa and Tanzania this upcoming summer with @andrewmklein to hopefully see some big cats play ball, summit Kilimanjaro, and tell some unexpected stories.

South Africa was my first experience in the African wild and it holds a special place in my heart. Pictured here is a lion we encountered on a night drive a few meters from our open air vehicle at Kruger National Park.

These past 5 years have flown by and I look back with a grateful heart as I prepare to come full circle.

All My Best,
Reuben

#bigcatsplayball

(at South Africa)

by Katherine Yaksich

| PENGUIN BREAKFAST | 

 Leopard seals violently whip penguins back and forth to skin them. It was extraordinary to witness this first hand in Antarctica. 

 Check out Paul Nicklen’s leopard seal photo series to see some incredible images of these wild beasts.  

 #antarcticaordie (at Antarctica)

| PENGUIN BREAKFAST |

Leopard seals violently whip penguins back and forth to skin them. It was extraordinary to witness this first hand in Antarctica.

Check out Paul Nicklen’s leopard seal photo series to see some incredible images of these wild beasts.

#antarcticaordie (at Antarctica)

by Katherine Yaksich

A gentoo penguin mother and chick at the Penguin Post Office in Port Lockroy. Unfortunately, this chick will most likely not survive since it got such a late start and winter is fast approaching.  

 #antarcticaordie (at Antarctica)

A gentoo penguin mother and chick at the Penguin Post Office in Port Lockroy. Unfortunately, this chick will most likely not survive since it got such a late start and winter is fast approaching.

#antarcticaordie (at Antarctica)

by Katherine Yaksich

Take flight!! This is my last image before I hit the Drake again for my 2nd Antarctic expedition #antarcticaordie (at Antarctica)

Take flight!! This is my last image before I hit the Drake again for my 2nd Antarctic expedition #antarcticaordie (at Antarctica)

by Katherine Yaksich

\ NOTHING BUT WHALE \ 

 My first Antarctic expedition was truly one for the books! 

 This was one of my favorite moments, seeing a humpback whale breach repeatedly for over an hour near the bow of our ship. At one point I actually had to choose between photographing the breaching whale or orcas.  

 According to one of our naturalists, this was quite a rare sighting so I feel very fortunate to have witnessed it even though my hands froze! 

 #antarcticaordie 

 (at Antarctica)

\ NOTHING BUT WHALE \

My first Antarctic expedition was truly one for the books!

This was one of my favorite moments, seeing a humpback whale breach repeatedly for over an hour near the bow of our ship. At one point I actually had to choose between photographing the breaching whale or orcas.

According to one of our naturalists, this was quite a rare sighting so I feel very fortunate to have witnessed it even though my hands froze!

#antarcticaordie

(at Antarctica)

by Katherine Yaksich

5 of 5 of the #blackandwhitechallenge 
 Nearly 5 years ago, I quit my job and relocated to NY from CA with hopes of becoming a photographer and filmmaker. Back then, the Holy Grail would have been to land an assignment for National Geographic, but I’ve since learned that I don’t necessarily need to shoot for Nat Geo to do meaningful work and tell powerful stories. In fact, one of my favorite photographers told me that he actually turned down his first assignment for Nat Geo. To be perfectly honest, I’m not even entirely sure if I could handle the pressure of such an assignment, and the thought of shooting 40,000 - 60,000 images for a single assignment is a bit overwhelming… 
 This year I had the incredible experience of being a photographer in residence onboard an expedition ship in the Arctic. I absolutely loved it because I got to explore such a beautiful and remote part of our planet doing what I love, and it was a meaningful and transformative experience because it helped me understand our fragile world a bit better and the importance of safeguarding the future of our earth. 
 I’m beyond excited to embark on the ship again in February for a month long residency in Antarctica, especially since Antarctica has been on my bucket list ever since I did a report on it in 4th grade. It is also my last and final continent to visit. 
 What kind of experiences transform and bring meaning to your life? 
 I nominate @andrewshepherd for the black and white challenge. I love working with Andrew not only because he is an overall wonderful human, but because his work is always unexpected, beautiful, and solid. 
 #thisarcticlife #neverstopexploring #notgeo

5 of 5 of the #blackandwhitechallenge

Nearly 5 years ago, I quit my job and relocated to NY from CA with hopes of becoming a photographer and filmmaker. Back then, the Holy Grail would have been to land an assignment for National Geographic, but I’ve since learned that I don’t necessarily need to shoot for Nat Geo to do meaningful work and tell powerful stories. In fact, one of my favorite photographers told me that he actually turned down his first assignment for Nat Geo. To be perfectly honest, I’m not even entirely sure if I could handle the pressure of such an assignment, and the thought of shooting 40,000 - 60,000 images for a single assignment is a bit overwhelming…

This year I had the incredible experience of being a photographer in residence onboard an expedition ship in the Arctic. I absolutely loved it because I got to explore such a beautiful and remote part of our planet doing what I love, and it was a meaningful and transformative experience because it helped me understand our fragile world a bit better and the importance of safeguarding the future of our earth.

I’m beyond excited to embark on the ship again in February for a month long residency in Antarctica, especially since Antarctica has been on my bucket list ever since I did a report on it in 4th grade. It is also my last and final continent to visit.

What kind of experiences transform and bring meaning to your life?

I nominate @andrewshepherd for the black and white challenge. I love working with Andrew not only because he is an overall wonderful human, but because his work is always unexpected, beautiful, and solid.

#thisarcticlife #neverstopexploring #notgeo

by Katherine Yaksich

This past summer I had the wonderful opportunity to observe and photograph polar bears in the Arctic for my first time. The mother and cub pictured here was actually my first polar bear sighting, and I remember this moment quite vividly and will probably never forget it. Seeing polar bears in the wild transformed me, and made me truly realize how fragile our environment is. 
 I want to share some text that was posted on the @natgeo Instagram feed yesterday: 
 “Polar bears have come to represent the Arctic ecosystem and we look to them as an indicator of the health of the polar region they roam. Due to human-caused climate change, the Arctic is currently experiencing the warmest air temperatures in four centuries, and sea ice losses in the summer of 2012 broke all previous records. Polar bears are feeling the pressure; their populations are declining in Churchill, Manitoba in direct correlation with the loss of sea ice. The sea ice freezes later each fall and melts earlier each spring which means less time for hunting on sea ice. We must act today to change our carbon-emitting habits. It is estimated that if current climate trends are correct, two-thirds of the polar bear population could disappear by 2050. All the creatures from the top of the food chain to the bottom who are specially adapted to life on ice depend on humans to act now to lessen their carbon emissions that have caused these changes. What daily decisions are you making to reduce your carbon footprint?” 
 #thisarcticlife #saveourseaice 

This past summer I had the wonderful opportunity to observe and photograph polar bears in the Arctic for my first time. The mother and cub pictured here was actually my first polar bear sighting, and I remember this moment quite vividly and will probably never forget it. Seeing polar bears in the wild transformed me, and made me truly realize how fragile our environment is.

I want to share some text that was posted on the @natgeo Instagram feed yesterday:

“Polar bears have come to represent the Arctic ecosystem and we look to them as an indicator of the health of the polar region they roam. Due to human-caused climate change, the Arctic is currently experiencing the warmest air temperatures in four centuries, and sea ice losses in the summer of 2012 broke all previous records. Polar bears are feeling the pressure; their populations are declining in Churchill, Manitoba in direct correlation with the loss of sea ice. The sea ice freezes later each fall and melts earlier each spring which means less time for hunting on sea ice. We must act today to change our carbon-emitting habits. It is estimated that if current climate trends are correct, two-thirds of the polar bear population could disappear by 2050. All the creatures from the top of the food chain to the bottom who are specially adapted to life on ice depend on humans to act now to lessen their carbon emissions that have caused these changes. What daily decisions are you making to reduce your carbon footprint?”

#thisarcticlife #saveourseaice