g adventures

by Katherine Yaksich

BlackRapid Double  
 I reached out to the team at   BlackRapid   and asked if I could try out their Double camera strap during my photo residency in the Arctic this past summer, and they were so kind enough to send me a strap. I was really impressed by how functional and comfortable the strap was, and it truly allowed me to take photos much more quickly and efficiently and made my job easier. You can miss a lot of shots in the Arctic if you’re too slow because the wildlife doesn’t seem to wait around. The right equipment can truly help make or break your shot! 
 I have a lot of friends and colleagues that shoot with 2 camera bodies without a double camera strap system, and it seems inefficient and challenging from what I have observed (one of my friends recently purchased the Double and another BlackRapid strap and is extremely satisfied). I’m excited to head down to Antarctica next month with the Double, especially since Antarctica is my final continent to explore and has been on my bucket list ever since I was in 4th grade! 
  I highly recommend the BlackRapid Double strap and outline some pros and cons below:  
 PROS 
  The Double is extremely comfortable (much more comfortable than using 2 separate camera straps) and distributes the weight of heavy camera/lens combinations quite nicely. In fact, it is the most comfortable strap I have used when using a heavy DSLR camera and long telephoto lens combination. 
 It is highly functional, easy to adjust, well built/designed, and lightweight. It’s a very secure way to use 2 cameras and allows you to access either camera body both quickly and efficiently. 
 The Double can easily be transformed into 2 separate single straps if you only want to use 1 camera. 
 It is very well priced, and worth every penny. Think of it as an investment into your body. Your back and neck will thank you for it. 
  CONS 
  If you bend over at the hips, the camera bodies will swing forward with your body and can potentially bump into objects in front of you, ie, if you bend over a railing to look down. 
 The metal carabiners (that lock the cameras to the strap) scratch easily but this is purely cosmetic and really a non-issue. It won’t affect the performance of the strap. 
  Live Adventurously,   Reuben

BlackRapid Double

I reached out to the team at BlackRapid and asked if I could try out their Double camera strap during my photo residency in the Arctic this past summer, and they were so kind enough to send me a strap. I was really impressed by how functional and comfortable the strap was, and it truly allowed me to take photos much more quickly and efficiently and made my job easier. You can miss a lot of shots in the Arctic if you’re too slow because the wildlife doesn’t seem to wait around. The right equipment can truly help make or break your shot!

I have a lot of friends and colleagues that shoot with 2 camera bodies without a double camera strap system, and it seems inefficient and challenging from what I have observed (one of my friends recently purchased the Double and another BlackRapid strap and is extremely satisfied). I’m excited to head down to Antarctica next month with the Double, especially since Antarctica is my final continent to explore and has been on my bucket list ever since I was in 4th grade!

I highly recommend the BlackRapid Double strap and outline some pros and cons below:

PROS

  • The Double is extremely comfortable (much more comfortable than using 2 separate camera straps) and distributes the weight of heavy camera/lens combinations quite nicely. In fact, it is the most comfortable strap I have used when using a heavy DSLR camera and long telephoto lens combination.
  • It is highly functional, easy to adjust, well built/designed, and lightweight. It’s a very secure way to use 2 cameras and allows you to access either camera body both quickly and efficiently.
  • The Double can easily be transformed into 2 separate single straps if you only want to use 1 camera.
  • It is very well priced, and worth every penny. Think of it as an investment into your body. Your back and neck will thank you for it.

CONS

  • If you bend over at the hips, the camera bodies will swing forward with your body and can potentially bump into objects in front of you, ie, if you bend over a railing to look down.
  • The metal carabiners (that lock the cameras to the strap) scratch easily but this is purely cosmetic and really a non-issue. It won’t affect the performance of the strap.

Live Adventurously,
Reuben

by Katherine Yaksich

MOTHERHOOD

Polar bears rolling in the deep at Hornsund, located on the island of Spitsbergen in Svalbard.

Filmed on location in the Arctic

by Katherine Yaksich

Arctic Short Video Series 3 of 4 (15 sec)

A time lapse of our expedition ship navigating through pack ice less than 600 miles from the North Pole, while we search for polar bears.

by Katherine Yaksich

This Arctic Life 
 One last shot before I go again - my favorite polar bear at Inglefieldbreen. Polar bears have transparent hair, black skin, and black tongues and are the largest terrestrial predator on earth. #thisarcticlife (at Svalbard)

This Arctic Life

One last shot before I go again - my favorite polar bear at Inglefieldbreen. Polar bears have transparent hair, black skin, and black tongues and are the largest terrestrial predator on earth. #thisarcticlife (at Svalbard)

by Katherine Yaksich

“The secret to success is to do what you love.” - Dr. Tom Smith, rifle master and naturalist 
 Tom is one of the most fascinating guys I have ever met and has some incredible stories that include traveling solo through the Arctic for 2 years on a single journey, living and hunting with the Inuit community, and saving a polar bear’s life by punching it in the face. I’m lucky to be part of this team #thisarcticlife #makeportraits (at Svalbard)

“The secret to success is to do what you love.” - Dr. Tom Smith, rifle master and naturalist

Tom is one of the most fascinating guys I have ever met and has some incredible stories that include traveling solo through the Arctic for 2 years on a single journey, living and hunting with the Inuit community, and saving a polar bear’s life by punching it in the face. I’m lucky to be part of this team #thisarcticlife #makeportraits (at Svalbard)