/ by Katherine Yaksich

The Svalbard Global Seed Vault in the Arctic was designed to withstand a nuclear bomb and, in the event of an apocalypse, act as a Noah’s Ark for plants.  It was designed to be a a beacon, a symbol of hope looking out over the over the Barents Sea. Built in 2008 by the Norwegian government (for $9 million), it houses 526,000 samples of seeds; scientists hope these might be interbred in order to adapt global agriculture to climate change, thereby averting mass starvation.  The vault extends 146m into the sandstone mountain; at the end, there are three airlocked refrigerated caverns with space to preserve up to 4.5 million strains of plants.  Full story here.

The Svalbard Global Seed Vault in the Arctic was designed to withstand a nuclear bomb and, in the event of an apocalypse, act as a Noah’s Ark for plants.  It was designed to be a a beacon, a symbol of hope looking out over the over the Barents Sea. Built in 2008 by the Norwegian government (for $9 million), it houses 526,000 samples of seeds; scientists hope these might be interbred in order to adapt global agriculture to climate change, thereby averting mass starvation.  The vault extends 146m into the sandstone mountain; at the end, there are three airlocked refrigerated caverns with space to preserve up to 4.5 million strains of plants.  Full story here.

Source: http://t.umblr.com/redirect?z=http%3A%2F%2...