70 mm film

by Katherine Yaksich

I had an opportunity to attend a screening of Samsara last week along with a Q&A with Ron Fricke and Mark Magidson and I am still in absolute awe from the whole experience. Samsara is, without a doubt, the most beautiful and most transcendant film I have ever experienced. Samsara was filmed entirely on 70 mm film over the course of nearly 5 years in 25 countries, and the time lapse photography is the best I have ever seen. Ron Fricke is the time lapse master and 70 mm film reigns king when it comes to motion picture, and nothing can compare or even come close. Samsara is a non-verbal film, but the imagery speaks so much on a deep, spiritual, and philosophical level exploring themes of birth, life, death, and rebirth. It is a visual masterpiece, unlike any other film I have ever seen.

Director Ron Fricke described Samsara as a guided meditation, and talked about how there are various paths for us to follow and that we are all capable of change. I was a little surprised by how short Ron’s answers were to the audience questions. For example, someone from the audience asked Ron how they do all of their research and Ron replied, “YouTube.” I had the opportunity to speak to Ron briefly after the screening and asked him how he got his day to night and night to day time lapses to look so smooth and he replied, “Multiple passes in editing." 

I can’t wait to see this film again and will most likely see it at least a few more times in the theater. Samsara opens tomorrow, August 24th, and I highly recommend that you go and experience this film on the big screen. Visit http://barakasamsara.com for more info about the film. 

There is also a Samsara art gallery exhibit at the New York Open Center, that runs until September 14th, 2012. More info here.

Countless individuals perform an elaborate martial arts exercise in this still from Samsara. Courtesy of Oscilloscope Laboratories.

Countless individuals perform an elaborate martial arts exercise in this still from “Samsara”. Courtesy of Oscilloscope Laboratories.

A thousand-armed goddess welcomes viewers of Samsara into what the filmmakers describe as a guided meditation on birth, life, death, and rebirth. Courtesy of Oscilloscope Laboratories.

A “thousand-armed goddess” welcomes viewers of “Samsara” into what the filmmakers describe as “a guided meditation on birth, life, death, and rebirth. Courtesy of Oscilloscope Laboratories.

A baby is baptised in a still from Samsara. Courtesy of Oscilloscope Laboratories.

A baby is baptised in a still from “Samsara”. Courtesy of Oscilloscope Laboratories.

by Katherine Yaksich

Samsara theatrical trailer. I can’t wait to see this film! I anticipate it to be one of the most beautiful films I will ever see and I aspire to be this good one day. Filmed on 70 mm over a period of almost five years and in twenty-five countries, SAMSARA transports us to sacred grounds, disaster zones, industrial sites, and natural wonders. Hits US theatres on August 24th.

by Katherine Yaksich

I cannot wait to see this film on an IMAX screen and I’m anticipating it to be one of the most beautiful films I will ever see.

Samsara is a new non verbal documentary film by the creators of 1992’s lauded “Baraka”. It took five years to make, and was shot in over 100 locations in 25 countries. It is one of only a handful of films to be shot on 70mm film in the last forty years. Directed by Ron Fricke and produced by Mark Magidson. Samsara will be in US Theaters August 24th 2012, with international releases soon to follow.

barakasamsara.com